Melts in your mouth, not in your hand. The power of branding.

Branding is helpful. It associates the company and the product to make things easier for the buyer. When you buy a package of M & M’s, you know what’s in that trademarked brown bag. No surprises. You seek that package out because you know what you’re getting. It’s a win win for product sales, but sometimes branding and packaging people can have a darker side. Take Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, for instance. His brand, of course, was detective fiction, notably his Sherlock Holmes stories. Wildly successful, of course, but Doyle grew tired of writing about his genius detective, so tired, in fact that he tried to kill off Sherlock in “The Final Problem.” No dice. Readers and his publishers wanted nothing from Doyle but Sherlock Holmes novels. Doyle was the victim of his brand.

What are some brands that you know and trust? Coke? Pepsi? Arm and Hammer? Are you typically willing to try a new product rather than the tried and true? Last day to enter the Amazon gift card drawing for September. sherlock

6 responses to this post.

  1. I am usually open to trying new things..I’ve read most of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries..but I have read some of Conan Doyle’s other works..:)

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  2. Posted by Lourdes Montes on September 30, 2013 at 2:55 pm

    Always willing to try a new product if the price is right except for Hellmann’s!!!

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  3. Conan Doyle would probably have done better with his speculative fiction (e.g., The Marracot Deep) if he’d used a pseudonym. That’s probably why some well-known authors write different genres using different names. Barbara Mertz famously did that with Elizabeth Peters (all rational science, at least at first) and Barbara Michaels (romance edged with fantasy & paranormal overtones). You’ve raised an excellent point, Dana! We do tend to go for certain brand names rather than others, but only if the flavor is pleasing. (That goes for foodstuffs as well as authors!)

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