Posts Tagged ‘fiction writing’

Writing a synopsis…the ugliest baking you’ll ever do!

Yeah. There are fun parts to writing…the plotting, the moment when you get that INCREDIBLE IDEA, the research, getting a peek at the new bookcover. Then there are those moments which are just about as much fun as crawling through thorn bushes in your birthday suit. The most wretched task for this writer is whipping up that synopsis. This is a process by which you take an amazing idea, strip it of all the art and charm and whap it out there in all its ugly horror for your editor. Oh, and you have to do this while somehow showing you are a master of your craft. Sigh. Here’s a video to describe the process.

So what part of your job or chore list would you be happy never tackling again? Do tell!

Test your Nutcracker trivia knowledge! Quiz time!

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Yes, I know it’s only October, but it’s never too early to test your Nutcracker trivia savvy! See how many of these answers you know.

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Author throwdown…weird animals,and embarassing junk food choices.

 

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Hey, all. So thrilled to be discussing the nutty world of fiction writing with fellow Harvest House author Virginia Smith! Take a look at our rockstar YouTube video. Like or comment on the  video for a chance to win one of our books. Subscribe to my YouTube channel to enter the August prize pack giveaway. God bless!

 

Research field trips? Who needs ’em?

 

Why bother going on a fiction writing research field trip anyway? In today’s techno world, you can sniff out any detail on the Internet, everything from facts to pictures to interviews, so why  venture out? For me, it’s the smell of a place, the pace of life and the  seemingly unimportant details that jump out to me that make the trip worthwhile. For instance, on the last research adventure to California’s Gold Country, we arrived at the end of summer and the rolling hills were covered by dry, golden grass. It has a certain smell, in the morning, in the afternoon, and in the evening as the ground cools down. That smell is important and it will help add descriptive dimension and give my novel an authentic feel, I hope. Below is a quick clip from a recent research trip. We’re doing a little August prize pack contest for those who subscribe to my YouTube channel. (A gift tote and books/or an Amazon ecard for those outside the U.S.) 

Have you read a book recently that made you feel like you were there in the fictional setting? Do share! 

On dogs, writing… and dessert!

 

Hey, all. Starting a new little feature here. Take a look and see what you think. Got a little August contest going for some nifty loot! :

Why not write on Sundays?

 

 

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Hello, all. I’ve been chit chatting about the writing biz a lot lately and one of the questions that always comes up is, “How do you balance two jobs, family, church, etc?” Everyone has the old balancing problem to solve, don’t they? We only have so much time in the day, right? I made the choice early on in my writing career not to write on Sundays, but perhaps not for the reasons you might think. I don’t write on Sundays because….

1. Writing is a blessing that can easily become an obsession. I have a passion to write that can become a monster, if I let it. Since my writing is also a business, that makes the tendency to obsess even greater. Three books a year, short stories, online presence, writing one book while creating a proposal for the next, the endless promotional efforts, all those things are requirements which can fill up the available hours if I let them. Sunday is the day I let those demands fall away, and come up for a much needed breath.

2. Writing does not belong in the center of my wheel.  I never really stop writing. Even when I am not sitting at a keyboard I can’t really shut my mind off. I’m inventing scenes, rolling through dialogue, wondering what would happen if so and so said this instead of that, constantly asking “what would happen if…?” It’s good and bad, believe me. I have an attention deficit, so I can appear to be completely engaged in a conversation when my mind is sometwhere else entirely. I will not go into how many problems that has caused! My decision not to write on Sundays is my effort to refocus on the important things, God, my family, church, pen pal letters, all the rich blessings God has showered down on me. God blessed me with the ability/opportunity to write, but He belongs in the center of the wheel.

Do you do something special on Sunday that refreshes your spirit? I would love to hear about it! 

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All that stands between Stephanie Pink and her dream is 100 pounds of trouble!

Fetching Sweetness, available now!

 

Three writing lessons from snow country.

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I live in Northern, California and this means that I am not rugged. I will admit this freely. It the temps drop below fifty I am not certain of my survival, and I am only vaguely familiar with the concept of snow. Hence, when I traveled to Lake Tahoe this weekend, I learned a thing or two! These lessons are so true of the writing life, so I thought I’d share.

Lesson #1: You’re gonna need chains. Yep, to write a book and make the summit you’re going to need some help. Yes, I know your car is nifty and has all the bells and whistles, just like your computer, but at the end of the day you’re going to need down and dirty helping tools like old obscure books (A Writer’s Guide to Poisons, anyone?). You’re going to find yourself hoarding good old fashioned notepads, and perhaps, dare I suggest it, a phone for calling various experts that do not respond to emails or texts. I know, archaic as old steel chains, but there it is.

Lesson #2:  You’re gonna need other people.  Writing is a solitary endeavor for sure. It’s a ‘buns in the chair’ get-it-done kind of slog up the mountain, but when you think you’re reached the summit, that’s where the strangers come in. You need to hand yourself over to that chain guy or that snow plow operator and trust your precious property into their hands. That is to say, you gotta let people help you. Often times, this means people you don’t know…hiring that proofreader, allowing that online critique group to read your work, or in the traditional publishing world, that editor who is going to potentially tear up your writing. It’s important. You have no objectivity about your writing, I’m sorry say. You need the chain guy and the snow plow operator to make your work the best it can be.

Lesson #3. God’s going to take you on an adventure. You will be changed by the journey. You will learn things about yourself that you didn’t know. God will show you sights more incredible that you could ever have imagined. Savor that as you head up the mountain.

Did you ever learn a lesson during your travels? Would love to hear about it! 

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